Beer Glassware

Pilsner

Pilsner

The typical pilsner glass is tapered, tall and slender. These features allow display of the beer’s color and carbonation, while providing good head retention. The emphasis of this glass is on the appearance of the beer above anything else. It is used primarily for lighter beers, such as a pilsner.

Flute

Flute

While more typically found holding a bit of the bubbly, a flute glass can indeed be used to house a beer as well. The glass is long and narrow helping to showcase the carbonation and channel the initial aroma up and out of the glass.

Pint

Pint

If you’ve got a beer glass in your cupboard, odds are its one of these. Easy to store and cheap to make, the pint glass comes in both 16 and 20 ounces versions, cylindrical and slightly tapered. Versatile and simple, the pint works for almost any beer, but doesn’t aid the tasting, smelling or head of any specific beer.

Imperial Pint

Imperial Pint

Also known as a “tulip” or “nonic” pint, this is a pint glass to the second power … the British-born imperial pint, which holds 100mL more of beer than the American pint. It’s a 20 ouncer to the American 16. The British Beer and Pub Association have strict rules ensuring that every pint poured on the island is indeed a true pint. Hence, this glass. Those conical pint glasses used in American pubs are robbing people of 4 ounces of beer!

Sam Adams Pint

Sam Adams Boston Lager Glass

The pint glass is iconic, and yet our friends over at the Boston Beer Company wanted more. So, they went to work perfecting the pint glass for their Boston Lager. What they came up with is officially called their Boston Lager Glass. Born from highly visionary and scientific ideas, this glass is uniquely refined for the beer tasting experience.

Goblet

Goblet or Chalice

Specifically designed to aid head retention, these bowl-like pieces allow for big swigs of your favorite Belgian-style ale. Resting atop a stem, the glass can be thick, as in the case of a chalice, or thinner and slightly more delicate as a goblet and is crafted to show off the body of the beer.

Tulip

Tulip

Called a tulip for good reason, this glass is shaped like the flower, bulbous at the base, thinning towards the center and flaring outward at the rim. Crafted intentionally, this glass allows a beautiful head to form, eases the release of aromas and has a big enough body to show off the color of the brew.

Stange

Stange

Used most often to serve kölsch, this traditional German glass is tall and slender. It helps to enhance the flavor in more delicate beers by creating a tighter concentration of volatiles.

Snifter

Snifter

Grandpa’s brandy glass has made it to the beer world. A great glass for strong ales, this glass has a wide body and tapered mouth, helping to enhance the aroma directly out of the glass and into the nose. The shape multitasks, allowing the drinker to circulate the beer easily and look classy at the same time.

Mug

Mug or Stein

Found most often in the beer halls of Germany, mugs serve a simple purpose: they hold a lot of beer. The wide mouth generously releases the aroma and the handle helps keep the warmth of your hands away from the cold brew. Steins are fancy mugs with lids, often decorative and made of ceramic.

Weizen

Weizen

If you have even a bit of perception, you’ve picked up what beer fills this glass. Weizenbier, or wheat beer, has a particular set of needs, each one satisfied in this shapely vessel. The weizen allows room for the typically large head of the brew, while the narrower rim focuses the aroma. Most often it comes in a 1/2 liter size, which leads the beer to warmth if not consumed more rapidly. Drink up!


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